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Assessing the effect of a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy(CBT)

 

Assessing the effect of a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy(CBT)-based workshop on work-related rumination,fatigue, and sleep

Published online: 23 Feb 2015 –Click here to read the full article
Dawn Querstreta (School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK)
Mark Cropleya, (School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK)
Pieter Kruger ( Cognacity- formerly LPP Consulting, London, UK)
Richard Heron (BP p.l.c., London, UK)

The relationship between work-related stress and ill health is undoubtedly underpinned by many contributing factors; however, perhaps the most critical mechanism is inadequate psychological and physical recovery from work(Fritz, Sonnentag, Spector, & McInroe,2010). When people go to work, they are confronted with many different kinds of physical, cognitive, and emotional demands. In order to deal with these demands, people must expend physical, emotional, and cognitive energy (Zijlstra &Sonnentag,2006). Using energy in this way results in fatigue at the end of the working day, and people’s “resources”(physical and mental) become depleted (Meijman, Mulder, & Van Dormolen,1992). Rest is then required in order for those depleted resources to be replenished. This process of replenishment is called “recovery” (often referred to as “recharging one’s batteries”), and the anticipated effect of this recovery process is the reduction of fatigue and associated health complaints (Zijlstra & Sonnentag,2006)

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